LFIAA Li Style (Lishi) Taijiquan “ Single Whip Posture” (Dan Bian Shi). To Double Weight Or Not.

In the Li Style (Lishi) Taijiquan Square Yard Form there are both Single (Dan) and Double (Shuang) Whip (Bian) postures. Within the Li Style Taijiquan Short Form both can be seen and performed, yet many practitioners of the Li Style Taijiquan perform the Single Whip Posture using a double weighted stance usually in a Riding Horse (Qi Ma Shi). As you properly all know that there should not be any double weighted stances at all in the practice of taijiquan in general, yet when the practitioner performs the Double Whip Posture (Shuang Bian Shi) the Leopared Stance (Bao Shi) is used otherwise known as a “High Half Squat Stance”, which places the bodyweight onto one leg.

So if the practitioner places their bodyweight onto one leg using the Leopard a Stance, when performing the Double Whip Posture. Then surely the same must be performed when performing the Single Whip Posture as seen in the accompanying photo of Laoshi Keith Ewers performing the Li Style Taijiquan Square Yard Form In the Kowloon Park, Hong Kong, China. The reason why I ask this question is that firstly there should not be any double weighted stances (Shuang Zhong Shi) used in the study and practice of taijiquan, yet many practitioners still widely use them in the practice of the Li Style Taijiquan Square Yard Form. Secondly, using double weighted stances means that for a few seconds the lower body stops moving, while the movements of the upper body are kept moving isolated from the non- moving lower limbs, which again goes against the Taijiquan classic rules that “If one part of the body stops moving, then the whole body should stop”.

Using single weighted postures allows the whole body to keep moving without pausing, hesitating or re-adjusting. As the Taijiquan classics says “If one part of the body moves, then the whole body moves”. This can only be maintained by each practitioner of the Li Style (Lishi) Taijiquan eradicating the many double weighted stances that are used by many practitioners and change them to single weighted stances. In simple terms, stop using Bear, Riding Horse, Snake and Eagle Stances and instead replace them with Cat, Leopard and Monkey Stances. Hence, then there are no more Double Weighted Stances used when one performs their Li Style Taijiquan Square Yard Form.

To many practitioners of the Li Style Taijiquan do not follow any of the guiding principles or rules that every other practitioner of other styles of Taijiquan follow. They are simply left to interpret what they think their Li Style Taijiquan should look and perform as. Sadly, because of this the use of Double Weighted Stance as been widely introduced into the practice of the Li Style Taijiquan, were it should never of happened if there was guiding rules for every practitioner to follow and understand on how to maintain accuracy and discipline in their practice of the Li Style (Lishi) Taijiquan Square Yard Form.

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